Teen Suicide Prevention‎
Teen Suicide Prevention‎

Teen Suicide Prevention‎

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What Are Teen Suicide Risk Factors?

Risk factors are habits or histories that put someone at greater likelihood of having a problem. Some of the risk factors for suicide may be inherited, such as a family history of suicide. Others, like physical illness, may also be out of your control. But if you can recognize the risk factors for suicide early and act to change the ones you can control, you may save your life — or that of a close friend or family member.

Read the suicide risk factors below and check the ones you can control. (For instance, you can talk to a mental health professional for ways to deal with lack of social support, feelings of hopelessness, or mood disorders like depression.)

It’s important to take these risk factors for suicide very seriously:

  • Previous suicide attempt(s)
  • Psychological and mental disorders, especially depression and other mood disorders, schizophrenia, and social anxiety
  • Substance abuse and/or alcohol disorders
  • History of abuse or mistreatment
  • Family history of suicide
  • Feelings of hopelessness
  • Physical illness
  • Impulsive or aggressive tendencies
  • Financial or social loss
  • Relationship loss
  • Isolation or lack of social support
  • Easy access to methods/means of suicide
  • Exposure to others who have committed suicide
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More About ...... Dr. Banafsheh Pezeshk, Psy.D. , QME

Dr. Banafsheh Pezeshk is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist and a Med-Legal Psychology Evaluator specializing in disability evaluations, medical evaluations, Fit For Duty evaluations, treating traumas, addiction, mood disorders, and other mental health conditions and concerns.

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Define your goals. Think about what you would like to get out of counseling. It might be helpful to write a list of events, relationship issues, or feelings that you think are contributing to your distress

Be an active participant. This is your counseling experience, so be as active as you can in deciding how to use the time. Be honest with the counselor and give her or him feedback about how you see the sessions progressing.

Be patient with yourself. Growth takes time, effort, and patience. All of your coping skills, behavior patterns, and self-perceptions have been learned and reinforced over a long period of time, so change can be difficult and slow at times.

Follow your counselor's recommendations. Take the time between sessions to complete any activities suggested by your counselor. Counseling is intended to improve your life in the "real world," so making efforts to try out and practice new behaviors, approaches, or ways of thinking could be a crucial element to the success of your counseling experience..